Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

Oh how I wanted to love this book but I just didn’t.  Instead I found myself sending longing gazes to my big pile of books on my nightstand willing for this one to end only so I wouldn’t have to abandon it.  It wasn’t that I wanted to know what happened, I really didn’t, it wasn’t that I owed it to anyone to read it, I just didn’t want to not finish it in case it got good.  Well , by the time I turned the final page I realized that it never did get good.  I never did care much for the characters.  I never did care much for what would happen next.

The premise is delightful though, the pictures are perfectly creepy, and yet the story just falls flat for me.  The characters are not that interesting either.  So before I completely slaughter this book I better just end it.  I don’t know if I will bring this into my classroom, not that a 5th grader couldn’t handle it, because they could.  I just don’t know if anyone would really want to read it.

From Goodreads:

A mysterious island. An abandoned orphanage. And a strange collection of very curious photographs. It all waits to be discovered in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, an unforgettable novel that mixes fiction and photography in a thrilling reading experience. 

As our story opens, a horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children who once lived here – one of whom was his own grandfather – were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a desolate island for good reason.

And somehow – impossible though it seems – they may still be alive.

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2 thoughts on “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

  1. Pingback: My Summer Reading List 2013: What Did I Accomplish? | lifeofafemalebibliophile

  2. Pingback: Review: Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children | Gnostalgia

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